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continue the discussion on climate science now with james hanson, head of the nasa institute for space studies and author of "storms of my grandchildren." he was awarded an award named for the scientist who advised seven u.s. presidents. this is about an hour and 15 minutes. [applause] >> i interview a lot of fantastic people in this room and that does not happen very often. in 1988, nasa scientist james hansen told a congressional hearing that it was 99% certain that burning fossil fuels was heating the earth's atmosphere. the next day, a new york times headline proclaimed a "global warming has begun." decades later, dr. hansen and others are still trying to convince the united states of these basic observations. about half of american now accept the fact. 40% do not. over the next hour, we will discuss clients -- climate science and public opinion with james hansen. today, dr. hansen is receiving [applause] i've interviewed a lot of fantastic people in this room and that doesn't happen very often. welcome to climate one, a conversation about america's energy, economy and environment.
, it turned out that it was a fellow republican, the chair of the house science committee, pro- sons, pro-environmental republican who came to defend my colleagues and me in this political witch hunt by his own fellow republican. a think you'll find this among many of my colleagues and scientists today. we do our best to frame this not as a bipartisan or political issue because it should not be. it is a fact of life that it has become somewhat of a partisan political issue. but there is some evidence that there are people on the republican side of the aisle were stepping up to challenge and do something about this problem. >> we sometimes make the mistake of saying that [indiscernible] science and values can provide the same information. i think they are completely complementary. signs is able to tell us what the problem is and what the consequences are of the trees is we make. our values is what happens from the sources. a village in alaska considers it already happened. a town and a texas might think it will not happen for a few tickets are lunker. we have to bring our values and to it.
cuts should be extended and for whom. taxation is not an economic science. it definitely -- if you gather 10 people in a room, you're going to get 10 different opinions and the views on taxing -- on the merits and philosophy of taxing individual asks the rich will vary. but, you know, this sort of immediate problem is not necessarily the larger philosophical question. it really is the more practical question of what is our tax system going to look like. host: and we've got this lead editorial from this morning's "wall street journal." real housewife offense the beltway. they write -- host: back to the phones. don in oklahoma city on our line for democrats. go ahead, don. caller: good morning. i have a couple of quick comments i would like to make. the first is that i find it ironic for so many years in recent history republicans have claimed to own patriotism yet they don't seem to want to vacate their fair share. host: joseph rosenberg. guest: you know, i mean, i'm not sure, you know, i'm not sure this is about pay. -- patriotism or anything like that. you know, the question of wh
straightforward guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> we're about to say good-bye to 2012 but not before talking about some of the top legal cases of the year. for that we bring in the legal guys. avery friedman, a civil rights attorney and law professor in my hometown, cleveland, and richard herman, a new york criminal defense attorney and law professor who joins us from las vegas. hello, happy holidays to both of you. >> same to you, marty. all the best. >> you, too. >> let's talk first jerry sandusky. a few things to bring up here. as we all remember, he was the penn state assistant football coach convicted in june on 45 counts of child sex abuse. he's now serving 30 to 60 years in prison. jerry sandusky says that he has now focused or he is focused on his appeal. he's got a hearing that i believe is set for january 10th on his pretrial motions. guys, there's a newspaper in northeastern pennsylvania that says sandusky sent a handwritten note saying he is trying to endure, and there was a lo
at the embarcadero. exploratorium was one of the first hands on science exhibitions in the country. we were just there with the kids about a month ago. there is so many things to do and hands-on learning, it's the best. today is free. >> it is 4:37. we want to take advantage of mike nicco. i know one word, we need you mike. >> okay, yeah. >> for information. >> i don't have any money, what else do you want? let's talk about spare the air. poorest air quality in the santa clara valley once again, but all of us are under spare the air and possibly again tomorrow. so no burning of any type of wood. other big story, freeze warning in the north bay, mid 20s until 9:00. frost advisory for the bayshore line and santa clara valley, temperatures in the low 30s through 9:00. keep the pets in and plants protected until that time. once we get passed that, by noon mostly sunny and upper 40s. low to mid-50s by 4:00, so slightly warmer than yesterday. clouds will lead us to a chilly evening with upper 30s to mid 40s. as we head into thursday, friday and saturday, partly cloudy on thursday. slightly warmer on f
'll set money aside from his first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. constipated? yeah. mm. some laxatives like dulcolax can cause cramps. but phillips' caplets don't. they have magnesium. for effective relief of occasional constipation. thanks. [ phillips' lady ] live the regular life. phillips'. >>> we're going to turn now, to our "consumer watchdog" tonight. and this internet scam thriving this holiday season. fbi reporting tonight with more than 150,000 stranded traveler complaints. and here's abc's elisabeth leamy now. >> reporter: it came from halfway around the world. a frightening e-mail that landed in an abc producer's inbox. it looked like it was from a friend. "my trip to manila, philippines, with my family has been a mess. i was hit at the back of my neck with a club. i need you to loan me some money." was this real or a hoax? skeptical, our producer decided to play along. "okay, don't worry." i think i can come up with a few hundred at least." we wired just 20 the con artist picked up the money within hours and c
it well and a grown man can never master it." "it is almost a science, and yet if is a puzzle without an answer. it requires complete concentration and total relaxation. it satisfies the soul, fortifies the intellect. it is at the same time, rewarding and frustrating." mr. palmer, we had your golf partner's statute shipped in here, too. i think he just dropped the potter. [laughter] i thought -- i am not a great golfer, but as a psychologist, i understand the psychology of the sport in that sense. and i thought, since there's probably one our two call first here, i can probably pass on to you what i think is the greatest golf device ever, and it is a story about mr. palmer and the manager of the detroit tigers. i was having dinner with jim, who is also known to have a colorful word or two when he speaks, and he told me about a round of golf he was playing with arnold palmer. he was chipping everywhere but the affair with. i am sure that he had a word or two. after a few holes or so, mr. palmer said to him "jim, which you like a little advice?" if any of us had a moment where arnold pa
coulter, it will smash your house. this is about internalizing science and making the science become part of the cultural vocabulary. the problem with the right-wing agenda with this huge cloud of disinformation is people are very naive and the arts can help and catalyze an emotional discussion. the numbers are speaking. we have had record level drought, we have record-level firestorms, and storms. colorado, texas, the list goes on of places that have been hammered. you have to be foolish, someone like george bush to not process that. you have -- it is incredible. you still have to point out, your house is on fire. you are like, really? that is my take on it as a downtown dj. >> the last question on the left. >> thank you. part of what you said about the gift giving economy. an anthropologist wrote a book on the gift economy and wrote another book on "the ethnography of direct action" which touched on things that happened with occupy. with social movement, the eupepsia -- maybe you can speak to a -- going toward reaction and fizzling out? or you see this accelerating, moving from a creati
't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. a body at rest tends to stay at rest... while a body in motion tends to stay in motion. staying active can actually ease arthritis symptoms. but if you have arthritis, staying active can be difficult. prescription celebrex can help relieve arthritis pain so your body can stay in motion. because just one 200mg celebrex a day can provide 24 hour relief for many with arthritis pain and inflammation. plus, in clinical studies, celebrex is proven to improve daily physical function so moving is easier. celebrex can be taken with or without food. and it's not a narcotic. you and your doctor should balance the benefits with the risks. all prescription nsaids, like celebrex, ibuprofen, naproxen, and meloxicam have the same cardiovascular warning. they all may increase the chance of heart attack or stroke, which can lead to death. this chance increases if you have heart disease or risk factors such as high blood pressure or when nsaids are taken for long periods. nsaids, including celebrex, increase the chance of serious skin or allergic r
math metically, where science ends, the part that makes you feel good but you don't know why, the way the object feels and looks and you can almost if it's perfectly created explain it to somebody else afterwards but in the creation part you can't. you can see how the glass is constantly moving. my job is to basically shape it. and balance it at the same time. you do that, you get these wonderful shapes, glass really rewards the risk. lot of times with glass you're waiting for the piece to cool down and temperature to adjust and split seconds where you've got a fraction of a second to make a particular move in a particular way and you don't get to repeat it if could you it wrong so there's a performance to it. it's sort of like dancing. you can't really think about it and do it really. you just have to do it enough that it becomes sort of mechanical, and then you can sort of free your mind to design. ♪ [ male announcer ] some day, your life will flash before your eyes. make it worth watching. introducing the 2013 lexus ls. an entirely new pursuit. >>> a member of the paparazzi is de
him, nd he'll set money aside from his first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >> announcer: 'tis the season of more-- more shopping, more dining out... and along with it, more identity theft. by the time this holiday season is over, an estimated 1.2 million identities may be stolen. every time you pull out your wallet, shop online or hit the road, you give thieves a chance to ruin your holiday. by the time you're done watching this, as many as 40 more identities may be stolen. you can't be on the lookout 24/7, but lifelock can. they're relentless about protecting your identity every minute of every day. when someone tries to take over your bank accounts, drain the equity in your home, or even tries to buy a car in your name, lifelock is on guard. and with lifelock's 24/7 alerts, they contact you by text, phone or email as soon as they detect suspicious activity in their network. lifelock wants you to be protected this holiday season, so they're giving you 60 days of protection risk-free. >> my years as a prosecutor taugh
reported in the history of science. the last ten years goes down as the hottest ten years recorded in the history of science and that means more wacky weather, more moisture, more energy. global warming is a misnomer. it should be called global swing. >> which means the world doesn't end tomorrow. it's just every little event is worse or inkre meantycrementally worse than before. >> you look at all the glaciers are receding. the ice caps has diminished by 50% just in the last 50 years. an area the size of united states in terms of ice disappeared this year over the polar ice caps. the seasons are changing. summer is longer winter is shorter, tropical diseases are moving north. all the indicators show that the earth is warming up and that's what's driving some of this wacky weather. >> duh that show more or could we snap back? >> get used to it. we could be experiencing more 100-year flooding storms, hurricanes because there's more energy circumstance lating. we could argue how much human activity is driving it but everybody agrees the earth is heating up ther
for a world in which science fiction is rapidly becoming science fact. >> we were put here to to touch, to smell, to taste, to see and to hear the universe. that's a great role. that's a great responsibility. >> osgood: it took more than just rocket fuel to propel sally ride into orbit. as america's first woman in space, she was a role model for those who dream of shooting for the stars. earl scruggs, he aimed high. his picking elevated the five-string bang owe from second fiddle status to star of the show. ♪ (andy griffith theme). >> reporter: no doubt you remember this tune. andy griffiths' may bury recalled our own hometowns as we remember them or wish they could have been. >> if you ever come by this way again, be sure and stop by. i hope you have more time though. we don't like to see folks hurrying through like this. >> osgood: he was something of a friend, one we'll remember for a long time to come. so long, andy. ♪ at last ♪ my love has come >> osgood: we leave it to you, the great etta james to close out our tribute to those who left us in 2012. we only wish we had a bit
't want to take the film coat off. i am getting back into science fiction. not a reaction to history. this has been a deep passion for me. now that it's almost ready to come out, my next film this is complete opposite of this in terms of tone and genre. >> what do you watch when you're at home? have a favorite series? watch "homeland?" >> i watch "homeland" my wife and i are watching it every sunday night. and the same way we watched "24." i'm a news junky. >> "homeland". >> "modern family." i like "revolution some. >> band of brothers. talking about "private ryan" led to "band of brothers" and written several years ago, i thought was fascinating, when we were growing up, you go to school and sit around the office and talk about the great movies. now, it's more, did you see what happened last night, could you believe what happened with brodie last night. it did all start with "band of brothers" in 2001? >> "band of brothers," that was the first time we took the steven ambrose book and did research on that and laid out 10 hours to honor the veterans, especially -- you know -- to me, t
what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. bikes and balloons, wholesome noodles on spoons. a kite, a breeze, a dunk of grilled cheese. catches and throws, and spaghettio's. that's what happy kids are made of. campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. >>> we're back with more on that breaking news. secretary of state hillary clinton has been released from the hospital. this is new video of clinton's motorcade leaving the hospital just a short time ago. she had been there since sunday recovering from a blood clot in her head. doctors now say she's making good progress on all fronts and they're confident she'll make a good recovery. this is great news. and now that mrs. clinton is out of the hospital, we're waiting on an apology from the right wing. after news broke two weeks ago that clinton suffered a concussion after fainting, they went on the attack. >> you don't want to go to a meeting or a conference or an event, you have a diplomatic illness. >> why don't we apply the same standards we apply to school kids. i want to see a doc
aside from his first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. ♪ let's stay together >>> when you look at this picture, what do you think? at what point was it taken? >> i think we were campaigning in iowa. >> so why were you hugging her so hard in iowa? >> because i love my wife. >> and also, i hadn't seen him in a while. when you're campaigning, we're two ships passing in the night. and the first time i saw him was when i walked on stage to greet him. and that's my honey giving me a hug. >> how do you keep the fire going? >> that's a good question. >> you know, we've been married now 20 years. >> mm-hmm. >> like every marriage, i think, you know, you have your ups and you have your downs. but if you work through the tough times, the respect and love that you feel deepens. >> and then there's a lot of laughter, you know. >> and you're funnier. >> yeah. for the most part. >> everybody thinks he's pretty funny. i'm funnier than people think. >> you are. >> that may be. you may be funnier than people think. >> barbara walters in th
approach. i mean, it's not rocket science to see that we have a democratic senate, a republican house and a democratic president, and that's going to be the same starting january 3 of next year for at least two more years. so we know what we're dealing with, and i think it affects us right now in the fiscal cliff negotiations because we are not going to do anything unless it is bipartisan. we will not be able to pass anything in the house that doesn't have significant republican votes in the senate, and the democrats in the senate are not going to be able to support something that won't require some votes of democrats in the house. so we are together, maybe it's like a dysfunctional family, but we do have to work together because without bipartisanship, nothing is going anywhere. therefore, i think you have to go back to negotiations 101. which is that someone in a negotiation has to win some and lose some. the other party in a negotiation has to win some and lose some. the president is not going to get everything he wants. the republicans in the house and senate are not going to get
of science, 50, 100 and 150 years from now. thank you so much for being with us from new york city this morning. guest: it's my pleasure. host: we now go to the floor of house of representatives. that's all for "washington journal" this morning. the house is in for morning hour and at noon for legislative usiness. the speaker pro tempore: the house will be in order. the chair lays before the house a communication from the speaker. the clerk: the speaker's rooms, washington, d.c. january 2, 2013. i hereby appoint the honorable david rivera to act as speaker pro tempore on this day. signed, john a. boehner, speaker of the house of representatives. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the order of the house of january 17, 2012, the chair will now recognize members from lists smithed by the majority and minority leaders -- submitted by majority and minority leaders for morning hour debate. the chair will alternate recognition between the parties with each party limited to one hour and each member other than the majority and minority leaders and minority whip limited to five minutes e
the most aboard climate science is going on. these are the most destructive fires in colorado history and they come after the warmest weather ever recorded. you could do the same exercise all over the planet. this is what it looks like as the planet begins -- and i underline begins -- to warm pita mohamed mursi had been declared the winner in each presidential race. >> we will respect agreements and international law as well as egyptian commitments and treaties with the rest of the world. >> to talk about the significance of election, we are joined by sharif of del produce. >> the first democratically elected in egypt's history. his win marks a victory over the lingering remnants of mubarak's regime. >> chief justice john roberts prove to be the surprise deciding vote. joining with the court's liberal members. >> the highest court in the land has not spoken. we will continue to implement this law and we will work together to improve on where we can. >> me state the positive first. this really is a huge victory for our side. in spite of all of my concerns with this law, it did not go f
at the science of it all. >>> this is fox 5 news at 5:00. >> second of state hillary teclinton is spending had you -o is spending her new year's evey in the hospital.ta this after doctors found a bloo clot in her head.her >> reporter: hillary clinton ist the hospital after the discovery of a blood clot on sunday. doctors found the clot during a follow up exam for a concussion she sustained earlier thiss month. secretary clinton is underun observation at new york presbyterian hospital through hs tuesday where she is being treated with blood thinners. the state department releasing a statement, saying her doctors will continue to assess her condition, including otherng issues associated with a cona customer. they will determine if any further action is required. medical experts say the seriousness of a blood clot depends on where it is. >> with the previous head trauma, may make her at risk for developing a bleed in her head. because they are thinning out her blood. it is classic and a very smart move to bring her into the hospital and observe her carefully. >> reporter: the top u.s. t diplomate
universities and allow more education in science and mathematics in the school system which would allow more people to do research in this field. to allow more electric energy instead of so much depending on petroleum and oil. guest: about the education system. the second question is about the role of private enterprise in these technologies. education is the silver bullet and the thing that we can do most cheaply and easily to get kids excited about solving big problems. it needs to begin not in universities but at elementary and high school level education. every year we choose 35 young innovators who we believe have the greatest capacity to change the world. this year most of the 35 lived and worked in the united states, less than five had gone to elementary school in the united states. they came from china, europe, israel. we are not doing a good job in the states in making science and technology a profitable activity, where kids can commit their entire lives and careers to it. the best thing we can do is to invest in science and technology and mathematics education in our elementary and
at the urban institute, and alisha coleman- jensen jensen, a social science fellow at the usda. i want to show this map, which might surprise people. virginia, maryland, pennsylvania, new york, they have less food insecurity. in the deep south, states like georgia, alabama, mississippi, texas and in california, there is more food insecurity. why? guest: there is regional variation, ranging from a low of 8% to a high of 19%. research has shown there are factors for households within the state, and also factors like economic conditions at the state level and state policies that affect food insecurity. the poverty rate in the unemployment rate varies across states, the level of education berries and other factors such as region varies, and other factors such as participation in food programs varies. the cost of housing, the average wages -- all of these factors affect food insecurity. host: susan, dayton, ohio. good morning. caller: i really admire the program and an emphasis on nutritious food, and i was wondering if there were any thoughts going toward that same thing with the snap program. gue
, and he'll set money aside from his first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >> bill: is traditional america gone for good good? that is the subject of this evening's talking points memo. my pal dennis miller believes traditional america has been vaporized that it is gone for good. >> do i think it will ever go back to my lifetime in the other way no, i don't. i think this is it. do i think it's the mercury saw from 18 to 58? no, i don't. is that the end of the world? , no it's not like i was in the shower this morning and find a lump in my armpit. that's always my fall back position. i have got a great life. but i'm just saying it is not the mercury have grown comfortable with. >> bill: i have given miller's election take a lot of thought. and i disagree with him. i believe traditional america can come back but it will take a very special person to make that happen. let's look at what happened. president obama received about 62 million votes. 11% less than he got in 2008. so he is slipping in popularity. mitt romney endedo u
to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> okay. two and a half minutes left. we've talked a lot about the resilience of the markets even in the face of the fiscal cliff market. maybe the market has been taking this in stride. look what happened today. we almost got to 20, the yellow flag area. we haven't been to 20 on the vix since back in july, early july, and today we're up 3.7% at 1928. however, look at a one--year chart of the dow comparing it to the vix. what often happens is when the vix peaks as it did in june and july, that can mark a bottom in the stock market so we're starting to move up again. i'm just saying. not trying to forecast anything and here's what happened today at the dow, sort of falling off here in the latter part of the hour but not off. off the lows of the day. down 21 points. material stocks were the strength today. up 1.5%. everybody else was either unchanged or lower. what do you make of the increased volatility or increased fear here, david darst, as we go into the end of the year
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sciences says it's extending the deadline to the transition to onliie make voting a little easier. originally... voters were by that time thursday. the nominees are expected to be annouuced january 10-th. and 3 weight watthers is speaking out... abouu its new ambassador's pregnancy.singer pessica simpson annnuuced last week... that she is expecting her second chiid.weight watcherssreleased a simpson and her amily. the staaement goee on to say... that simpson will not be following the weight loss plan during her pregnaacy..t's spokeswoman after theebaby s - born. 3&coming up.... we're just weeks awwa... fromm inauguration day.the intense prep work going on in d-c... and wwat makes this ceremony much different... than 4 yearss morning news.. all local.. all ((break 3)) ♪ chances are, you're not made of money, so don't overpay for motorcycle insurance. geico, see how much you could save. turkey sausage. turkey what? amazing. right? yeah. next one's on you. yeah, okay. introducing dunkin's new turkey sausage breakfast sandwich. the surprisingly great taste of turkey sausage
. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org
isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> good morning, him ecarol costello. it's 30 minutes past the hour. time to check our top stories. we're 30 seconds away from the start of trading at the new york stock exchange. representatives from the new york national guard are ringing the opening bell today. [ bell ringing ] more than 4,000 guards and airmen helped the victims of superstorm sandy. investors are still concerned about the looming fiscal cliff. >>> blizzard warning in up to six states. in arkansas the national guard has been called to provide ambulance service for residents. heavy snow and strong winds will lead to whiteout conditions across the ohio river valley. the heaviest snow is expected to move into western pennsylvania and new york state this afternoon. >>> hundreds of american families wanting to adopt russian children may have their dreams dashed. they have given final approval for a ban on such adoptions, seen as payback for a recently signed u.s. law imposing travel and financial restrictions on human rights abusers in russia. >>>
to understand there is no established science right now to determine whether or not a gene will predispose someone to violent behavior. i mean that's the first thing. this is a very complicated situation. people have genes. they don't always predispose or actually turn into a specific problem. and in this case if someone were to be found to have a gene, and this is a needle in a haystack, it might give some clues as to whether or not someone might or, other people might be predisposed to this kind of crime. heather: this would be a first of a kind study or a first of a kind research to >> again, there have been studies that have been done on violent offenders, and previously and we have gotten some body of evidence that helped us to determine whether this is a problem. where it is more established, where we're doing genetic testing where it is incredibly value in determining predisposing conditions such as taysak's disease or whether someone ends up with sickle cell anemia. whether someone is predisposed to alzheimer's or cancer it gets controversial and this particular probably the most c
gifts but others say they have it down to a science. >> make it in, say you that don't want it and they exchange it or -- they usually give you store credit. they won't give you money back. >> don't take it back, that's rude, just give it to someone else. >> may work. other people say instead of trading something they donate their unwanted gifts to charity. >> stanford fans headed to this year's rose ball game to see the cardinals battle wisconsin. the stadium is having a face lift but the big project is taking longer than expected. project managers say it's not going to be finished until 2015. >>> san jose state will play in the military bowl. it'll face bowling green. a team that ranks 7th in the nation. experts prwill come away with the win. the military bowl is set to kick off tomorrow at noon. >> should be a lot of fun. we are keeping track on the traffic. we understand there is caltrain delays. >> up to an hourlong and this is because of a system wide mechanical failure. trains in the north and southbound direction are impacted. we have a lot of spin outs in the s
ruled out any gun fire. they believe the sound of large science falling over may have led people to report shots fired. >> you start thinking the worst thing that can happen. i imagine someone with a gun or just -- someone coming to the store and threatening us. >> we hid behind the jewelry counter and then -- we need to get out of here. i'm not going to get shot. >> i immediately called my mom and just wanted to talk to her. >> reporter: even after it was over and the mall reopened it was hard for many to catch their breath. >> just never know what could happen. >> sacramento police released these photographs of the two adults they say caused the disturbance. the 19-year-old and 18-year-old -- his name and photograph weren't released because he is a minor. >> a mailman at the center of a scandal. what is happening. >> and it was targeted by arsonists. >> walnut creek police still on the screen of an officer involved shooting. we will have the latest. [ woman ] ring. ring. progresso. i just served my mother-in-law your chicken noodle soup but she loved it so much... i to
... or wonderfully the market's behaving... which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> since this show began in february, we have closed out nearly every saturday program with a segment called "foot soldiers" and it is a feature highlighting one person or group who has created positive action in the communities for change. this is large or small. and the foot soldiers have ranged from the three new jersey girls who was a presidential moderator, to dr. mcstuffins who shows girls they, too, can be doctors. and the father and son teen who got out to get out the vote for people during hurricane isaac and simply because they had a vote, and activism. all of our foot soldiers are changing our lives. f for the first time ever, i have a table full of them. and i am joined by a director of a support for children whose parents are in prison, and also, a founder for children of lgbt youth, and also project director of a center for victims of sexual assault, and also, the drek er tor of osborne association which offers rehabilitation for those in the criminal justice system. i
him, and he'll set money aside from his first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> we're following the breaking news here in washington. house republican leaders, they are meeting right now, they are trying to decide whether to vote on the senate's fiscal cliff bill that passed in a lopsided 89-8 majority in the middle of the night. many republican lawmakers, though, have grave concerns about the lack of spending cuts in the senate-passed bill and they could decide to amend the measure, send it back to the house. tom foreman is working this for us. tom, how big of a complication would this be? >> this is massive, wolf. i can't even say how big it is. i'm standing inside of our virtual senate where last night a lot of people thought solutions were under way as they passed all of these different measures that would have something to do with the fiscal cliff but on the other side of the capitol, on the house side, dark clouds have been gathering all day long because there are some things that were passed here that the house
each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> we are at the top of the hour. hello to you all. welcome to "weekends with alex witt." i'm t.j. holmes in for her today. 1:00 in the east, 10:00 in the west. let me tell you what is happening. we've got three days to go until we go off that cliff, the fiscal cliff. new today one key congressman is giving us a sober status report of where things are. >> i think there is a sense of urgency, t.j., just because of where we are. we're right at the deadline. as a matter of fact, it looks like we will be here on new year's eve and possibly new year's day. they've already alerted us, members of the house, to look at the possible way of doing that. >> at this hour, senate leaders are scrambling to piece together a last-minute deal to avoid middle class tax hikes and possibly delay steep spending cuts. both sides weighing inned to. >> congress can prevent it from happening if they act now. leaders in congress are working on a way to prevent this tax hike on the middle class, i believe we may be ab
first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >> announcer: ladies and gentlemen, it's "the stephanie miller show." ♪ i'm walkin' on sunshine ♪ ♪ i'm walkin' on sunshine ♪ ♪ and it's time to feel good ♪ ♪ hey, all right now ♪ ♪ and it's time to feel good ♪ >> stephanie: happy new year, everybody! it is the "the stephanie miller show." look, a late holiday gift for you, jim. the new twitter adolf twittler. you know what else looked at my profile? adolf twitler? >> it is the adolf twitler. >> that's funny. >> stephanie: all right. also this late holiday gift, kim jong il died of rage. we'll have audio on that. >> bring back kim jong il. he's beyond ill. >> stephanie: he's way beyond ill. [ ♪ magic wand ♪ ] by the way ma hollow, aloha. i'm just back from maui. a good time was had by all including me and sexy liberal tour director, roland, who, by the way i'm not sure if he's home yet. it took him 48 hours to get to hawaii. you don't w
the aging population. also in terms of quality. they measure the performance in mathematics, science, and reading and rank countries every three years. and then productivity. productivity is supposed to account for about 60% of white one country grows and another does not. how efficient we are in using capital labor and rule of law, how open the business environment is. we know what is happening there. look at the frame work and applied it to the emerging markets. i am incredibly bullish for 2013 and the years ahead. places like africa -- compared to over 100% in places like greece and italy. these countries are not suffering from the leveraging problem. 60% of the emerging world is under the age of 25. over the to% in places like uganda. there are issues with youth employment. we are talking about 30% increases. opportunity for economic growth. things like political improvement in terms of democracy and freedoms. i have to have this debate with you, bill. countries like rwanda have been ranked number 1 by the world bank as the most improved. then the closed by telling you this. 90%
because, of course, this is science hour, of course, but i was just reading up on this, but, you know, in rats, even in dogs and other animals, the calorie-restricted diets do increase the life span by one-third. they did a study on primates. it doesn't seem to actually translate to primates. therefore, people are assuming it doesn't translate to humans. >> just read this story because you want to have it in context. it does not mean you eat bgarbae that's out there. >> obviously you have to eat right. the book you're writing, there's some people that actually eat well are never hungry. maybe slightly overweight, but they eat healthy. those people are fine. >> yeah. and that's a hard diet to accomplish in the food environment that we live in, which is what i'm writing about. >> not if you wrap it all with bacon which is what i do. >> you have a resolution. >> what is the resolution? >> he's going to lose weight. he's going to get in really good shape. >> i think i'm looking pretty good right now. >> right. >> you look slightly overweight. >> i'm doing all right. >>> with us now, chief
things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> welcome back to "squawk box" this morning. look at futures we averted. the dow looks like it would open 86 points higher, s&p 50025 points higher and the nasdaq open up about 52 points higher. >> our next guest was confident we would get a deal when we talked to him 48 hours ago. senator, you did call this correct on monday, a deal was close. we reached that deal. what do you think about it afterwards thinking about the moving parts. >> if there's anybody in the senate had a reason to vote against this, it was me. i've been livid and talking to myself over the last year and a half. i'm surprised they didn't commit me on the plane yesterday coming down. look, when you're trying to save our great nation, when you're trying to deal with these massive deficits we have, you have to use your head and not your heart. when you're dealing with a president that, let's face it, is a spend a holic and really has shown no leadership on this issue. you have to use your head. at the end of the
and financing, if you look at the statistics are round or they measure the performance in mathematics, science, and reading, you can see where the problem is. today, they were in the number 27, 28, and so on. productivity generally is the x factor that accommodates for 60% of why one country grows and another does not. generally, it includes things like political dynamic, so we know what is happening there. that is not my prediction. look at this framework, capital, labor, productivity. you will see why i am incredibly bullish. in terms of capital, these economies by a large did not have the debt burden that other countries are facing right now. why is that important? these countries are not suffering from a deal leveraging problem. 60%-70% is under the age of 25. in you got there, over 50% is under the age of 15. we can talk about that once i sit down. once again, a really interesting story. they were talking about 30% increases over goods and services. in virtually all statistics, things like political improvements and freedoms, this is really essential. countries like rwanda have been ranke
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